Brooklyn Couple Breaks Up in YouTube Video

If only every relationship could end in an amicable music video.

Brooklyn-based couple Jonathan and Ivory are making viral headlines with their YouTube sensation song that chronicles their relationship’s demise in light of opposing views.

According to the song’s lyrics, Ivory takes an adamant stance against having children, in contrast to her pro-kid partner Jonathan who makes clear that he “wants to have babies.” After five years of dating, the couple have concluded their conflicting desires leave no other choice but the inevitable break-up.

The song delves further with its lyrics, assuring mutual friends that they “don’t have to choose” sides, “though it will be awkward, yes.” The ex-couple additionally requests invitations to friends’ parties, assuring they will still remain cordial:  “No, don’t feel weird; we love all of you! After five whole years at each other’s sides, there’s just some things no relationship can survive.”

The YouTube video concludes with an eager Jonathan admitting he wants a couple of children, juxtaposed to a negating Ivory who simply shakes her head in disagreement.

What’s your take on this couple’s breakup rendition? Do you believe this civil break-up ballad ends on a musical note, or nonsensical approach?

Warner and YouTube agree to music video deal

YouTube

When YouTube and Warner failed to reach a licensing agreement last December, the music group removed all of their music videos from the beloved website. Talks have since resumed, and the two are close to completing a deal that will put videos from Madonna, Green Day, and label-mates back on YouTube.

What hasn’t been reported, so far: The deal terms themselves. Neither company is talking, but sources familiar with the negotiations tell me the new pact will be similar to the one Google’s (GOOG) video unit struck earlier this year with Universal Music Group.

That deal created Vevo, a sort of “Hulu for music videos” owned by Universal and Sony (SNE). So think of Warner’s deal as a “son of Vevo”.

The big idea is the same: Try to create more value for videos by limiting their distribution and creating a more ad-friendly atmosphere around them, and share ad revenue between YouTube and the videos’ owner.

Then there’s the ad platform itself: I haven’t been able to get a concrete definition of what this is supposed to look like , but for now I’m imagining something like the “channels” YouTube has made for partners like ESPN, except they’d be made on an artist-by-artist basis.

All in all, this sounds like a fair deal. Warner loses a guaranteed revenue stream, but if its contention about the value of its videos is correct, it will make even more than it did under the old arrangement. Meanwhile YouTube gets to hang onto “premium” inventory, without being locked into the kind of pay-per-play arrangement that helped drive the site’s expenses sky-high.

While it’s unclear when Vevo will launch, remember that the site will only stream videos from Universal artists. This potential deal with Warner will keep its content on YouTube. Of course, this is all subject to change.

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